10 Inspiring Latinas Who’Ve Made History

Since 2003, NLBWA-LA has been here to support those Latinas who are seeking success. More than 50 years after the passage of the Equal Pay Act of 1963, Latina’s typically earn only 54 cents for every dollar earned by white, non-Hispanic men and must work nearly 23 months to earn what white men earn in 12 months. Latina Equal Pay Day — the day when Latina pay catches up to that of white, non-Hispanic men from the previous year — is being observed likely in November of 2020. A network of state and local organizations improving workers’ lives through research and advocacy.

Check out our education page for more about our values on education and what we do. In order to ensure that the information resonated with all generations, the team chose to feature a multi-generational family, with a grandmother, mother and several children. “We learned a lot from these women, mostly that there are several barriers to counseling, and that overall awareness of being at-risk is low,” said Hurtado de Mendoza. Lean In Circles Circles are small groups of women who come together for real talk and peer support—and right now we’re meeting virtually.

In 2017, Hispanic high school students were 50 percent more likely to be obese as compared to non-Hispanic white youth. Latinas comprised 32.9 percent of all Latino state senators in 2010; women as a whole only represented 22 percent of state senate seats.

College graduation rates for Latinas have increased faster than any other group of women. Rossina Gallegos facilitates and manages the charitable contribution and the Foundation grant making for Los Angeles and Orange County. She also implements strategies, tactics and programs to maximize the talent and availability of Union Bank employees with the needs of low-and moderate-income communities.

The Wage Gap For Latina Workers Is Still 54 Cents That’S Troubling.

Likewise, the early waves of the Cuban migration were primarily families. After they Bay of Pigs failure, many middle class Cuban families sought escape from the newly communist Cuba in the United States.

Luz María Frías is an attorney who is known for her advocacy around issues of race and gender equity. Currently, she is one of the cohosts of MPR’s podcast Counter Storiesand in July 2020, Luz was appointed Deputy Attorney General of the state of Minnesota. Dolores Cacuango, also known as Mamá Doloreyuk, was an influential figure in the fight for Indigenous and farmers’ rights in Ecuador. Frequently considered as one of the first activists of Ecuadorian feminism, her advocacy focused on education, protection of native lands and government reform in recognition of Indigenous rights.

  • We contribute to prior geographically focused research by evaluating the association of the 2016 presidential election with preterm births among Latina women using national data with an interrupted time series design that controlled for temporal variation that might otherwise lead to spurious findings.
  • Our results suggest that the 2016 US presidential election was associated with an increase in preterm births among US Latina women.
  • In the only study of the potential effect of the 2016 presidential election on birth outcomes, Krieger and colleagues19 found that the rate of preterm births among Latina women in New York, New York, increased from 7.7% before the inauguration to 8.2% after.
  • Second, it remains unclear whether the patterns found in New York City generalize nationwide.
  • Because preterm birth varies seasonally,20 for example, a comparison between the periods before and after an event such as a presidential election should ensure that any association does not arise solely from seasonally expected shifts from lower to higher numbers of preterm births.
  • Although Krieger et al19 provide evidence consistent with an association between the election and preterm births among Latina women, the methods the authors used did not adjust for secular trends, cycles, or other forms of temporal patterning that could lead to spurious findings.

Gender bias—whether deliberate or unconscious—is holding women back at work. Pairing a card-based activity with short videos, 50 Ways gives you the tools to address bias head-on. Here are some practical resources about the topics that are top of mind for women right now.

The National Latina Business Women Association was established in 2004 to meet the needs of the growing community of Latina Entrepreneurs, Executives and Professionals. NLBWA-SD believes in “Investing in Latinas” and has developed business networking, membership programs & benefits for its members, including monthly meetings (mixers, breakfasts, seminars &luncheons) all held at a centrally located and unique venue with incredible speakers and panelists. The National Latina Business Women Association (NLBWA-SD) was established in 2004. It was created to meet the needs of the growing community of Latina Entrepreneurs, Executives and Professionals.

The pattern of job losses by age in the COVID-19 recession is generally consistent with the pattern in the Great Recession and in previous recessions. In a Pew Research Center survey conducted April 29-May 5 young adults ages 18 to 29 were also more likely than older Americans to say that they have lost a job or taken a pay cut because of the coronavirus outbreak.

In the Great Recession, immigrants lost jobs at a slightly slower pace than U.S.-born workers. Hispanic women have experienced a steeper decline in employment (‑21%) in the COVID-19 downturn than other women or men.

Studies show that SNAP benefits are too low even during better economic times; this is particularly problematic during downturns because many participants will be out of work or earning very low pay for longer periods and receive less help from their extended families. An additional methodological limitation was that our comparison intervention also focused on HIV, rather than serving as a true placebo to guard against Hawthorne effects. Thus, future HIV prevention trials would benefit from inclusion of a time-equivalent comparison condition that focuses on a topic other than HIV prevention but addresses a relevant and important health issue for Latina women. We relied on self-report data, had a relatively short follow-up, were unable to assess condom use by partner type, and lacked objective and quantifiable biological outcomes, such as incident sexually transmitted infections, to assess intervention efficacy. Future trials of HIV interventions conducted with ethnically diverse samples of Latina women would benefit by addressing these limitations.

Jean Campbell, MS, is a breast cancer survivor and advocate, and the founding director of the American Cancer Society Patient Navigator Program. We work closely https://ibsiyad.org/a-secret-weapon-for-honduran-girls/ with other service providers and government agencies, and other non-profit organizations to ensure that we provide the most that we can for the community.

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